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Archive for February, 2012

This cinta was found among Miss Elizabeth Bishop Perkins’ (1869-1952) collections from her travels to Mexico and Guatemala in the 1940s. A cinta is a hair ornament. The colors and patterns woven into the cinta indicate the social status of the woman wearing it as well as the village from where she comes. Cintas, which can be 4 or 5 feet long, are braided into the hair. The braid is then wrapped around the head like a hat. While cintas are ornamental, they also serve as a way to help keep hair clean.

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This political pin belonged to Winifred Augusta (McIntire) Donnell (1924-1994) York, who was apparently a supporter of Alfred Mossman Landon and Colonel Frank Knox. Landon and Knox ran against Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1936 presidential election. Landon only carried the states of Maine and Vermont.

 

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Although this has the appearance of a schoolgirl’s sampler, Luther Warfield was a married 30-year old man when this was made.

You can get an idea of how the wallet would have looked in its finished state by looking at the above example (same wallet, two views). This wallet was made by Abigail Wallworth (1840-1865), but usually needleworked wallets are associated with men.

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Unfortunately the identity of the writer and his true love have been lost to time, although his sentiments are not. Inscribed along the maze is the following poem: “Crossing, winding, turned in and out, Ne’er ceasing? …turning round about. And as you see it links…crosses…/so has thy beauty proved to me a share/For by the influence of true love I find/I am unanswered? both head and Mind. Then fairest Creature look with pity down. And do not on thy faithful Servant frown/But pardon him who does thy Love desire/And much delights thy beauty…For…so dear. Then let thy beauteous rays shine forth in comfort from a lovely face, That on my ravish’d… rais’d by thy…pass to bliss forget?/In a…kiss?/that with love may…in Heven [sic-Heaven]/And evermore be…/What so these crosses in the knot may be? dissolved? when both? in concert move/A true Love’s…you…bend,/An Emblem of my love without an end;/When first I saw you you did sliley play/The gentle Thief-and stole my Hear away/Render me mine again and keep? your own/Too [sic-two] is too much for you, Since I have none. But if you refuse I’ll say “Thou art/A fair faced Creature with a double Heart.”/Lovers well know, what Grief it is to part/When between them both there lieth but one Heart.

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